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Oxalic Acid Vaporizer Treatments

December 08, 2020

Oxalic Acid Vaporizer Treatments

Oxalic Acid Vaporizer Treatment For Varroa Mites

You may have found yourself going into overwintering and still struggling with Varroa mites this year. It is extremely important to treat your mites as it can weaken your hive or ultimately kill your hive.

The weather is cold now, and you can’t open your hive, but it’s the perfect time to use Oxalic Acid Vaporizer to treat mites. When all brood is hatched and the mites are on the new bees in the cluster, the vaporizer works best as it reaches the mites on the bees.

Here is what you need to know.

What is it? Oxalic Acid is an organic compound H2C2O4. Oxalic Acid is found in foods like peanuts, pecans, wheat bran, rhubarb, beets, potatoes, berries, dark leafy greens and more.

How does it work? When the acid is heated, it gives off a gas that is absorbed by the mites and it suffocates them. The great news is that oxalic acid does not harm your bees, comb or queen. You will hear quite the buzzing sound from your hive as they try to circulate the air and remove the vapour.

How do you do the treatment? You will need a power source to use the vaporizer. Some people use car batteries or simply plug in if they have access to electricity. The tray on the vaporizer gets very hot. It will heat the crystals so that it crystalizes and vaporizes. You will place the tray inside your hive for about three minutes. Winter is the perfect time to do it as the bees are clustered in your hive, and it is sealed well. This treatment is best to do between November to February. Watch our how to video.

Recommended dose:  Follow instructions on your package, but 1 gram per brood chamber. Treatments should be done 10 days apart with 2 to 4 treatments.

Safety Precautions: Your safety comes first. You need to cover up well, and we recommend using a ventilation mask to protect your lungs and eyes. 

It’s easy to use, you can order oxalic acid and equipment online today! 

If you have any questions, email us.




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