Free returns on all items + Free shipping on orders over $350

Signs of Swarming

July 02, 2020 2 Comments

Signs of Swarming

It’s swarm season, and we are seeing more reports in the online beekeeping groups of swarming. Every year we get asked by new beekeepers if they have to split their langstroth hive, our answer is usually, 'yes'. Many new beekeepers don’t want more bees, but people need to understand that your honey bees go under a huge population explosion unlike anywhere else in the world in July. You need to ensure that you have a strategy in place so that they don’t swarm. If you don’t do something to manage your hive, your bees will swarm, and you will lose out on your honey crop. No one wants that to happen!

In the Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba and British Columbia, we recommend splitting your two box hive in late May for spring management to ensure your hive doesn’t swarm. If you haven’t split your hive(s), you will need to watch it closely throughout June and July for signs of swarming.

SIGNS OF A SWARM

  1. TOO MANY FRAMES OF BROOD. In late May, if you have more than 5-7 frames of brood in a two box hive, you need to do something to manage your hive. In mid-June if you have 14-15 frames of brood, you need watch your hive closely so that it doesn’t swarm.
  2. QUEEN CELLS. If your bees are making queen cells they may be preparing to swarm. Check the bottom of frames between boxes for queen cells (a favourite spot they build them).
  3. REDUCTION IN ACTIVITY OR LETHARGIC. If your bees seem to have slowed down, they may be getting ready to swarm. Reduced activity can be a sign of swarming since they are not bringing as much into the hive to expand it.
  4. NO WEIGHT GAIN IN A 5 to 7 DAY PERIOD. If you have a hive scale monitor and your hive has not gained weigh in a week, it is a sure sign of swarming. They are not building the hive up and preparing to swarm.

 

Why do honey bees swarm? 

As your bees prepare for the main flow they are building their population and the queen is heading toward her maximum laying capacity of approximately 1,500 eggs per day. In Alberta, we see a huge population explosion unlike anywhere else in the world. Your hive can have 80,000 bees! That's a lot, and it can happen quickly in Alberta. Honey bees need sufficient room to grow, or they will decide as a colony to swarm. Essentially, when your hive runs out of room, the queen will lay another queen in preparation for leaving with half of the hive. When they swarm, half the hive will leave and the other half will stay with the new queen. It's survival, but it will leave you with no honey this season.

What can you do?

If you didn’t do a hive split in May, you will have to monitor your hive closely every 10 days for queen cells. If you find them, knock them off and remove 2-3 frames of brood, and replace these frames with drawn foundation.

If you are worried about losing your bees to a swarm, you can also place a swarm box on your property with drawn comb so that if they do swarm, they will find it and go there. The swarm usually won't go too far from the hive at first since the queen is not great at flying and they will need to scout for a more permanent location.  A swarm box is a good option to use if you are concerned and leaving on vacation in July.

If you have questions, email us or leave comments below.

Our Edmonton store is now open with the COVID phase 2 re-opening. We ask you follow the social distancing rules while visiting our store. New Edmonton Store Hours: Monday to Friday 12 PM to 4 PM.

 




2 Responses

Shane Hansen
Shane Hansen

July 07, 2020

“remove 2-3 frames of brood, and replace these frames with drawn foundation.”

What do you recommend we do with the 2-3 frames of brood that we remove from the hive that is expanding to fast?

Shirley
Shirley

July 07, 2020

Will you be available Monday at 8. My bees have swarmed and there does not seem to be any baby bees or queen What should I do?

Leave a comment

Comments will be approved before showing up.


Also in Education

2022 Honey Bees
2022 Honey Bees

February 14, 2022

The new beekeeping season is just around the corner, and we can't wait for the sounds of buzzing bees and sights of flowers blooming. Depending on what you’re beekeeping plans are for 2022, here are our live bees that will suit your every need.

Continue Reading

Thank you
Thank you

December 24, 2021

We thank you for joining our hive and doing beekeeping with us. We have been busy bees behind the scenes working on exciting new projects that we want to tell you about.

Continue Reading

Hiveworld Quarantine and Undertaking
Hiveworld Quarantine and Undertaking

December 08, 2021

Hiveworld Quarantine and Undertaking

This resulted in a quarantine order that meant we could not move bees. The source of the infection could not be confirmed. In hindsight, this was complicated by the alarming increase explained in the link below. Having never experienced this before, it was a very difficult time for us at Hiveworld.

Continue Reading