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Hiveworld.ca is your go-to for answers and solutions

August 07, 2018

Hiveworld.ca is your go-to for answers and solutions

Hiveworld.ca staff check in with customers to ensure complete satisfaction with our bees and products. and we are delighted with the very positive response!

Bees supplied to Hiveworld.ca are government-inspected before they are delivered to our customers. This ensures your Hiveworld.ca bees are disease-free and ready for a healthy, productive summer.

Of course, it is not uncommon for bee colonies to run into a variety of issues once they are on the beekeeper's property. Hiveworld.ca is firmly committed to giving you the personal and hands-on support you need to resolve any problems that arise, by phone or email, or with a site visit as we are able.

As a rule of thumb, your hive at this point should have two 10-frame boxes full of bees, weighing between 75 and 80 lbs combined to be in great condition for over-wintering. Using a weigh-scale is better than prying open the brood boxes and disturbing the queen and bees inside them. If you suspect your hive`s condition is falling short, please contact Hiveworld.ca today.  




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